Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 2, Episode 5

In this episode of Technicolor Theatre, filmmaker Aditya Joshi, artist-inventor-technologist Nader Helmy and data scientist Basil Seif discuss their experiences with 9/11, performative activism, and the scarily accurate Egyptian representation in Ramy’s “Strawberries” (Season 1, Episode 4).

The episode aired on August 31, 2020 under the podcast’s previous name, Token Theatre, and can be found here. Full transcript (below) was captured by Madelyn Gee.

Aditya Joshi: Hello, and welcome to Token Theater, a Mediaversity podcast about representation on film. My name is Aditya Joshi and joining me today, now that they finished googling “nice boobs” on their compact desktop computer…


In Conversation with Actor-Comedian Rita Sengupta

By Madelyn Gee

Photo of Rita Sengupta / Still from ‘Chutney Popcorn’

This interview is excerpted from an episode of Technicolor Theatre podcast, which originally aired on August 24, 2020. Listen to the full interview or read the transcript.

Rita Sengupta is a queer South Asian American actor and comedian based in Brooklyn, NY. She chats with podcast host and filmmaker Aditya Joshi about coming out to a South Asian family, queer representation, and Nisha Ganatra’s absurd and heartfelt debut film Chutney Popcorn (1999). Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for clarity.

Aditya: I feel like this happens a lot with queer movies, where the narrative centers around…


Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 2, Episode 4

In this episode of Technicolor Theatre, filmmaker Aditya Joshi and comedian/actor/writer Rita Sengupta discuss how the directorial debut from director Nisha Ganatra, Chutney Popcorn (1999), has a continuing legacy in queer South Asian cinema despite it being seen by many as one of a kind.

The episode aired on August 24, 2020 under the podcast’s previous name, Token Theatre, and can be found here. Full transcript (below) was captured by Madelyn Gee.

Aditya Joshi: Hey folks. Aditya here — Just wanted to give you a quick note before we get into today’s episode. We had a bit of a tech…


In Conversation with Actor-Activist Jonathan Peck

By Madelyn Gee

Photo of Jonathan Peck / Press still from ‘The Hate U Give’

This interview is an excerpt from an episode of the Technicolor Theatre podcast, which originally aired on August 18, 2020. Listen to the full interview or read the transcript.

Jonathan Peck is an actor-activist from New York. He chats with podcast host and filmmaker Aditya Joshi about catalyzing activism, recent responses to police brutality, and the parallels of his protest experiences to the film adaptation of The Hate U Give (2018). Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for clarity.

Aditya: Let’s talk about The Hate U Give. This movie came out a few years ago and…


Mediaversity’s Guide to the 93rd Academy Awards, Best Picture

Written by Alicja Johnson

Blue header banner with psychedelic statuette graphics. Centered is the Oscars logo in gold lettering
Blue header banner with psychedelic statuette graphics. Centered is the Oscars logo in gold lettering

Hollywood’s favorite time of the year has arrived. No, not the Oscars — it’s Mediaversity’s annual diversity ranking of the Academy Award nominees for Best Picture!

Here at Mediaversity Reviews, we evaluate films through an intersectional lens. So while we might enjoy the witty scripts and tear-jerking performances typical of Oscar nominees, we care just as much about a movie’s gender parity and racial diversity. Oh, and our grading system also factors in depictions of LGBTQ communities, people with disabilities, minority religions, adults over 50, and diverse body shapes. …


Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 2, Episode 3

In this episode of Technicolor Theatre, filmmaker Aditya Joshi chats with activist and actor Jonathan Peck about catalyzing activism, recent responses to police brutality, and the parallels of his protest experiences to the film adaptation of The Hate U Give (2018).

The episode aired on August 18, 2020 under the podcast’s previous name, Token Theatre, and can be found here. Full transcript (below) was captured by Madelyn Gee.

Aditya Joshi: Hello, and welcome to Token Theatre, a Mediaversity podcast about representation on film. My name is Aditya Joshi and joining me today, he has just come from sleeping outside New…


In Conversation with Writer-Director Ola Kalejaye

By Madelyn Gee

Photo of Ola Kalejaye / Press still from ‘Get Out’

This interview is excerpted from an episode of Technicolor Theatre podcast, which originally aired on August 11, 2020. Listen to the full interview or read the transcript.

Ola is a writer-director originally from Lagos, Nigeria. He chats with podcast host and filmmaker Aditya Joshi about racism in the film industry, anti-Blackness within the Asian American community, and the inspiring genius of Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning film Get Out (2017). Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for clarity.

Aditya Joshi: So good to have you on the podcast, Ola. But before we dive into Jordan Peele’s masterpiece, Get…


Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 2, Episode 2

In this episode of Technicolor Theatre, filmmaker Aditya Joshi and filmmaker Ola Kalejaye chat about tokenism, racism in the film industry, commodifying Black bodies, and the inspiring genius of Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning film Get Out (2017).

The episode aired on August 10, 2020 under the podcast’s previous name, Token Theatre, and can be found here. Full transcript (below) was captured by Madelyn Gee.

Aditya Joshi: Hello and welcome to Token Theatre, a podcast about representation on film. We are proudly part of the Mediaversity podcast network. Joining us today, now that he has finished running from his white girlfriend’s house…


In Conversation with Li Lai, Founder of Mediaversity Reviews

By Madelyn Gee

Photo of Li Lai / Press still from ‘The Farewell’

This interview is excerpted from an episode of Technicolor Theatre podcast, which originally aired on August 4, 2020. Listen to the full interview or read the transcript.

Li Lai is the founder and editor-in-chief of Mediaversity Reviews. She chats with podcast host and filmmaker Aditya Joshi about their immigrant backgrounds, the feeling of losing someone overseas, and a mutual love of Lulu Wang’s The Farewell (2019). Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for clarity.

Aditya Joshi: I think there’s a lot of importance in how you view a film for the first time, and I think…


Graded on Gender, Race, LGBTQ, Disability, and more.

Written by Li Lai

This has been a supremely weird year for cinema. But like the scrappiest of underdogs, the industry soldiered on. To celebrate the moments of joy that filmmakers were able to bring us, often right into our homes during quarantine, we’re counting down Mediaversity Reviews’ top films of the year. (You can also check out our previous lists for 2019, 2018, and 2017.)

If you’re new to our publication, a quick rundown: We score movies based on gender parity and racial diversity, taking into account the representation of LGBTQ, people with disabilities, older adults, minority religions, and…

Mediaversity Reviews

TV and films graded on gender, race, and LGBTQ diversity. Visit us at mediaversityreviews.com.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store