In Conversation with Writer-Director Ola Kalejaye

By Madelyn Gee

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Photo of Ola Kalejaye / Press still from ‘Get Out’

This interview is excerpted from an episode of Technicolor Theatre podcast, which originally aired on August 11, 2020. Listen to the full interview or read the transcript.

Ola is a writer-director originally from Lagos, Nigeria. He chats with podcast host and filmmaker Aditya Joshi about racism in the film industry, anti-Blackness within the Asian American community, and the inspiring genius of Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning film Get Out (2017). Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for clarity.

Aditya Joshi: So good to have you on the podcast, Ola. But before we dive into Jordan Peele’s masterpiece, Get…


Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 2, Episode 2

Logo: “Technicolor Theater, a podcast by Mediaversity”
Logo: “Technicolor Theater, a podcast by Mediaversity”

In this episode of Technicolor Theatre, filmmaker Aditya Joshi and filmmaker Ola Kalejaye chat about tokenism, racism in the film industry, commodifying Black bodies, and the inspiring genius of Jordan Peele’s Oscar-winning film Get Out (2017).

The episode aired on August 10, 2020 under the podcast’s previous name, Token Theatre, and can be found here. Full transcript (below) was captured by Madelyn Gee.

Aditya Joshi: Hello and welcome to Token Theatre, a podcast about representation on film. We are proudly part of the Mediaversity podcast network. Joining us today, now that he has finished running from his white girlfriend’s house…


In Conversation with Li Lai, Founder of Mediaversity Reviews

By Madelyn Gee

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Photo of Li Lai / Press still from ‘The Farewell’

This interview is excerpted from an episode of Technicolor Theatre podcast, which originally aired on August 4, 2020. Listen to the full interview or read the transcript.

Li Lai is the founder and editor-in-chief of Mediaversity Reviews. She chats with podcast host and filmmaker Aditya Joshi about their immigrant backgrounds, the feeling of losing someone overseas, and a mutual love of Lulu Wang’s The Farewell (2019). Highlights from the conversation are below, edited for clarity.

Aditya Joshi: I think there’s a lot of importance in how you view a film for the first time, and I think…


Graded on Gender, Race, LGBTQ, Disability, and more.

Written by Li Lai

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This has been a supremely weird year for cinema. But like the scrappiest of underdogs, the industry soldiered on. To celebrate the moments of joy that filmmakers were able to bring us, often right into our homes during quarantine, we’re counting down Mediaversity Reviews’ top films of the year. (You can also check out our previous lists for 2019, 2018, and 2017.)

If you’re new to our publication, a quick rundown: We score movies based on gender parity and racial diversity, taking into account the representation of LGBTQ, people with disabilities, older adults, minority religions, and…


Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 2, Episode 1

Logo: “Technicolor Theater, a podcast by Mediaversity”
Logo: “Technicolor Theater, a podcast by Mediaversity”

In the first official episode under the Mediaversity banner, filmmaker Aditya Joshi and Mediaversity Reviews founder Li Lai bond over their immigrant backgrounds, the feeling of losing someone overseas, and a mutual love of Lulu Wang’s The Farewell (2019).

The episode aired on August 4, 2020 under the podcast’s previous name, Token Theatre, and can be found here. Full transcript (below) was captured by Madelyn Gee.

Aditya Joshi: Hello, and welcome to Token Theatre, a podcast about representation on film. My name is Aditya Joshi and joining me today, now that she’s finished playing the chicken drinking game with her…


Full Transcript of Technicolor Theatre podcast: Season 3, Episode 1

Logo: “Technicolor Theater, a podcast by Mediaversity”
Logo: “Technicolor Theater, a podcast by Mediaversity”

To kick off Season 3 of Technicolor Theatre podcast, Aditya is joined by Aneesh Chaganty, the director of the new Hulu film Run, to talk about their experiences with India, telling stories about communities other than your own, and the divisive legacy of 2008’s Slumdog Millionaire.

The episode aired on December 10, 2020 and can be found here. Full transcript below.

Aditya: Hello and welcome to Technicolor Theatre, a Mediaversity Reviews podcast about representation on film. My name is Aditya Joshi, and I could not be more thrilled that joining me today, now that he has successfully convinced a group…


Mediaversity Reviews announces a new partnership

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Mediaversity Reviews, the first website to evaluate movies and television on the basis of their minority representation, is launching its first foray into the podcasting world by partnering with Token Theatre, a podcast about diverse films hosted by Aditya Joshi. Joshi, along with producer Amanda Lewellyn, first launched the podcast independently, with six episodes released in Spring 2020.

Token Theatre’s first episode under the Mediaversity Reviews banner launched on August 4th, with Lai and Joshi discussing Lulu Wang’s The Farewell. Future episodes will be released weekly and will feature critics and artists from across the entertainment industry.

“Mediaversity Reviews was…


Mediaversity’s Guide to the 92nd Academy Awards, Best Picture

Written by Li Lai

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At Mediaversity Reviews, we champion fresh stories with new things to say. That’s why we base our TV and film reviews not only on technical merit but on the representation of voices that have been shut out of Hollywood for too long. Specifically, our scores factor in gender parity and racial diversity — and through bonus points or deductions, we also take into account the representation of LGBTQ, seniors, disability, minority religions, or diverse body shapes.

For more details on our grading system, click here. …


And how they fared at the box office

Written by Li Lai

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UPDATED — Click to see the Top 10 Most Diverse Films of 2020!

In keeping with tradition, here are Mediaversity Reviews’ top films of the year! You can check out our previous lists for 2018 and 2017. And for folks new to our publication, a quick rundown: We score movies based on metrics for gender parity and racial diversity, taking into account the representation of LGBTQ, older adults, disabilities, minority religions, or diverse body shapes. (See our full methodology here.)

This is by no means an exhaustive list — we reviewed 51 of the 903 films


A 2019 Snapshot of Recent Native Media (and Where to Watch)

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Still from Vai (2019) featuring Fiona Collins of Samoa

In celebration of Native American Heritage Month, we’re revisiting some of our favorite titles that feature indigenous talent across the globe. These recent works all remind mainstream audiences that Native people are still here, with much to say. It’s our privilege to listen.

Note: Mediaversity Reviews grades on metrics of overall inclusiveness, factoring in the representation of women, people of color, LGBTQ, and more. To read more about our scoring system, click here.

1. Deidra and Laney Rob a Train (2017)

Mediaversity Reviews

TV and films graded on gender, race, and LGBTQ diversity. Visit us at mediaversityreviews.com.

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